What A (Terrific, Exhausting) Travel Season

The two months since my last post -- and really, the past four months -- have been intense, rewarding and at times I'd even have to say extraordinary.  Four continents, 12 countries (8 for work + 4 for layovers), 40+ flights (no comment on carbon footprints please -- I'm trying to help the 2.6 billion people without water and sanitation) and more meetings with MFIs and watsan organizations than I can count.  Whew!Here's the big-picture overview -- think maps, pins and where-in-the-world:

  • Trip 1 (July - August): Kenya - Uganda - Ethiopia - Sweden - Netherlands
  • Trip 2 (September): Singapore - Hong Kong - India (8 cities, north to south and east to west) - South Korea
  • Trip 3 (October): London, England - Frankfurt, Germany
  • Bonus Trips: Kansas City, Los Angeles and Washington DC
  • Trip 4 (now):  Italy (Rome, Bergamo, Cinque Terre)
  • Trip 5 (forthcoming at end November): Berlin, Germany

There are too many highlights to note here; hopefully my Twitterstream has done some justice to these over time.  In addition to my personal observations, I have a WaterCredit Twitterstream that's focused specifically on water, sanitation and microfinance.  I talk a lot about toilets, poo and municipal water authorities these days... hmmm.  Well, given that we've got 2.6 billion people without appropriate WSH (that means Water, Sanitiation & Hygiene) today and -- despite significant resources, time, money and efforts being expended globally -- we'll have 4 billion people like this by 2025, I'd say more people need to join these conversations.But back to the travel theme...Such awesome trips, all of them.  Professionally, MFI interest in WaterCredit is broad and sincere; I couldn't be more pleased with how outreach meetings went.  The Water.org/WaterCredit team has a lot of follow-up work to do -- hurray!It was interesting and great fun to return to several places I'd visited in the past, but this time with additional work responsibilities and insights about "doing business" there.  My in-country Water.org colleagues were amazing hosts and enabled us to do, learn and experience things that I never could have done solo.  For example I will never forget the 11-course meal (including 4 rice dishes alone -- with everything from coconut to cracked pepper, pomegranates and cardamom) warmly prepared by the Water.org India country director's wife at their home in Tiruchirapalli, Tamil Nadu, and then playing shuttlecock (aka badminton) with his daughters afterwards.  And not least, the tumble I took in the street trying to return a volley.Alongside familiar places were several new ones too.  Among them:  Uganda; Bahir Dar, northern Ethiopia; and Frankfurt, Germany.  Uganda was a trip -- navigating through slums to MFI headquarters, roaming Kampala's first 24-hour Nakumatt superstore, and eating my first matoke (yes, it tastes like wet socks).  Visiting Bahir Dar was like a step back in time, to a bucolic verdant community removed from the frenzy of Addis.  I did have to remind myself however that we were there during the short wet season, when the land is eye-poppingly green; for most of the year it suffers from drought (hence Water.org's program there).  By the way, if you're curious about the kinds of water-works Water.org does in Ethiopia, here's one example.  And Frankfurt = what an unexpected treat!  I'd only been there in transit before; this time I attended a "Financing Sanitation" conference hosted by KfW.  Alongside that, we had opportunities to explore the delightful city center and ride in a bona fide Paternoster elevator.Now checking in from Rome, it's as lovely as ever -- especially with the crisp autumn air and thinner tourist crowds -- though also surprisingly expensive.  (Notwithstanding the awful $:euro rate, what's happened to the local economy in the past 3 years?!?)  I made the delicious mistake of ordering gnocchi al tartufo bianco at a local trattoria (simple family-run locale) and got nailed $40. The cafe' next to my hotel charges 9 euro ($13.50) for a double espresso ("only" 5 euro ($7.50) for a single). The metro is still a steal at 1 euro ($1.50) per ride, but trains are dear (80 euro ($120) for a 3-hour journey up north) and it's better to walk around town and enjoy the sights anyway...Which I've been doing whenever possible.  Piazza Navona, Pantheon, Forum, St. Peter's, Campo dei Fiori, all my favorite places already ticked off.  Especially enjoyed wandering the backstreets of Trastevere (stumbling upon a hole-in-the-wall forno with steaming-hot fresh bread, gawking once more at the stunning mosaics of Santa Maria in Trastevere), quaffing my first in-country cappuccino at Caffe' Sant'Eustachio, and doing a handstand in front of the Colosseum.  That makes handstands at 6 of the 8 Modern Wonders of the World (Great Wall of China, Pyramids of Giza, Petra, Macchu Picchu, Taj Mahal and Colosseum) -- Chichen Itza and the Giant Jesus in Rio, here I come!  Flickr photos up shortly.Of course the most important reason I'm here is the IDLO law-and-microfinance "grand finale" gathering.  It's like a family reunion with participants from 30+ developing courses whom I've been fortunate to meet and teach over the past 3 years.  We've come together to discuss lessons learned and the way forward; it's truly a humbling experience, and as usual (it feels like) I'm learning far more than contributing.  Simultaneous tracks in English, Spanish and French covering topics ranging from regulatory structures to consumer protection and branchless banking.  Wow... and makes me very excited for what could be next up for IDLO's microfinance team.On that note, back to microfinance credit ratings and (shortly) another espresso... Ciao for now, a presto!